ABOUT SOUTH AFRICAN LEGISLATION



Table of Contents
Acts in Force
Regulations in Force
Determinations in Force
Conventions
Agreements
Aeronautical Information Circular (AIC)
Aeronautial Information Publication (AIP)
    AIP Amendment Service (AIP AMDT)
    AIP Supplement Service (AIP SUP)
    AIRAC AIP Supplement (AIRAC AIP SUP)
    AIRAC Procedure
Notice to Airmen (NOTAM)


ACTS

The following is a list of civil aviation legislation applicable in the Republic of South Africa. It is essential that persons engaged in air operations in this territory be acqainted with the relevant legislation.

Carriage by Air Act, 1946 (Act 17 of 1946)

Act to give effect to a Convention for the unification of certain rules relating to international carriage by air; to make provision for applying the rules contained in the said Convention, subject to exceptions, adoptions and modifications, to carriage by air which is not international carriage within the meaning of the Convention; and for matters incidental thereto.

Civil Aviation Act, 2009 (Act 13 of 2009)

Act to repeal, consolidate and amend the aviation laws giving effect to certain International Aviation Convention and to provide for control and regulation of aviation in the Republic. To establish a SACAA and an Independent Aviation Safety Investigation Board. To give effect to certain International Conventions and to provide for effective control of safety and security of aircraft, airports, etc.

Air Services Licensing Act, 1990 (Act 115 of 1990)

Act to provide for the establishment of an Air Service Licensing Council; for the licensing and control of domestic air services; and for matters connected therewith.

Airports Company Act, 1993 (Act 44 of 1993)

Act to provide for the establishment of a public company and the transfer of the States shares in the company; to regulate certain activities at the company airports; and to provide for matters connected therewith.

Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company Act, 1993 (Act 45 of 1993)

Act to provide for the transfer of certain assets and functions of the State to a public company to be established and for matters connected therewith.

Convention on the International Recognition of Rights in Aircraft Act, 1993 (Act 59 of 1993)

Act to provide for the application in the Republic of the Convention on the International Recognition of Rights to make special provision for the hypothecation of aircraft and shares in aircraft; and to provide for matters connected therewith. (Schedule 6 to Civil Aviation Act 13 of 2009). The Mortgaging of Aircraft Regulations, 1997 are subservient to Act 59 of 1993.

International Air Services Act, 1993 (Act 60 of 1993)

Act to provide for the establishment of an International Air Services Council; for the regulation and control of international air services; and for matters connected therewith. The International Air Service Regulations, 1994 are subservient to Act 60 of 1993.

South African Civil Aviation Authority Levies Act, 1998 (Act 41 of 1998)

Act to provide for the imposition of levies by the South African Civil Aviation Authority; and to provide for matters connected therewith.

Convention on International interests in mobile equipment Act, 2007 (Act 4 of 2007)

Act to enact the convention on International interest in Mobile Equipment and the protocol to the Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment on matters specific to aircraft equipment into law. (Schedule 5 to Civil Aviation Act 13 of 2009)

South African Airways Act No. 5 of 2007

To provide for the transfer of the shares of Transnet Limited in South African Airways (Proprietary) Limited to the State; to provide for the conversion of South African Airways (Proprietary) Limited into a public company having a share capital incorporated in terms of the Companies Act, 1973; and to provide for matters connected therewith.

Shipping and Civil Aviation Laws Rationalisation Act No. 28 of 1994

To repeal certain laws relating to shipping and civil aviation; and to provide for matters connected therewith.

South African Express Act No. 34 of 2007

To provide for the transfer of shares, loan accounts, liabilities and guarantees in South African Express (Proprietary) Limited from Transnet Limited to the State to provide for the main objects and powers of South African Express (Proprietary) Limited; to provide for the borrowing powers of South African Express (Proprietary) Limited; to provide for the conversion of South African Express (Proprietary) Limited into a public company having a share capital incorporated in terms of the Companies Act, 1973; and to provide for matters connected therewith.

South African Maritime and Aeronautical Search and Rescue Act No. 44 of 2002

To incorporate the International Convention on Maritime Search and Rescue, 1979, and Annex 12 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, 1944, into South African law; to establish the South African Maritime and Aeronautical Search and Rescue Organisation; and to provide for matters connected therewith.

REGULATIONS

Domestic Air Services Regulations, 1991

Definitions, classes of air services, types of air services, categories of aircraft, insurance, manner and form of application for a licence, requirements for the operation of an air service in a safe and reliable manner. Manner and form of application for an operating certificate, contents of notices of application, operations manual, Form of temporary licence, form of licence, form of operating licence, form of surrender of licence, form of summons, manner and form of notification. Contents of representations, submissions of statistical information, register of licences, register of operating certificates, fees, passenger air transport tickets, airway bills, passenger lists, inspections.

International Air Services Regulations, 1994

Definitions, classes of international air services, types of international air services, categories of aircraft, insurance, application for a licence. Requirements in respect of aircraft, other than South African aircraft, concerning application for exemption. Contents of notice of issuing or amendment of licence, application for permit, requirements in respect of international air service concerning application for permit or amendment thereof. Tour operators permit, period of validity, period of validity of permit, application for operating certificate, contents of notice of application for licence or amendment thereof. Contents of notice or issuing or amendment of licence, contents of notice of application for permit of amendment thereof. Contents of notice of issuing or amendment of permit. Operations manual, form of temporary licence, form of licence, form of permit, form of operating certificate, form of summons. Manner and form of notification, contents of representations, furnishing of statistical information. The International Air Service Regulations, 1994 are subservient to the International Air Services Act, 1993 (Act 60 of 1993).

The Mortgaging of Aircraft Regulations, 1997

Definitions, deed of mortgage, discharge of mortgage, declaration of transmission of rights in mortgage, certificate of mortgage, register of aircraft mortgages, fees, powers of attorney and completion of documents, short title and commencement. The Mortgaging of Aircraft Regulations, 1997 are subservient to the Convention on the International Recognition of Rights in Aircraft Act, 1993 (Act 59 of 1993).

Civil Aviation Regulations, 2011

Definitions and Abbreviations, Procedures for Making Regulations and Technical Standards, Granting Exemptions and Notifying Differences, Aviation Accidents and Incidents, Powers and Duties of Authorised Officers, Inspectors and Authorised Persons, Certification Procedures for Products and Parts, Airworthiness: Non-type Certificated Aircraft, Engine Emission Certification, Noise Certification, General Maintenance Rules, Maintenance Rules Non-type Certificated Aircraft, Registration and Marking, Leasing of Aircraft, Flight Simulator Training Devices, Pilot Licensing, National Pilot Licensing, Flight Engineer Licensing, Cabin Crew Licensing, Air Traffic Service Personnel Licensing, Aircraft Maintenance Engineer Licensing, Medical Certification, Glider Pilot Licence, Free Balloon Pilot Licence, General Aviation and Operating Flight Rules, Conveyance of Dangerous Goods, Corporate Operations, Operation of Non-type Certificated Aircraft, Commercial Operation of Non-type Certificated Aircraft, Operation of Parachutes and Drop Zones, Air Cargo Security, Aviation Security Training Organisations, Aviation Security Screener Certification, Aviation Security, Aircraft Passenger Identification, Aviation Pandemic Preparedness Plan, Air Transport Operations-Carriage on Aeroplanes of more than 19 Passengers or Cargo, Commercial helicopter operations: passengers, cargo and mail, Helicopter Aerial Work and Certain Other Air Service Operations, Foreign air operations, Helicopter External-Load Operations, Air Transport Operations Carriage of less than 20 Passengers or Cargo, Air Transport Operations -Commercial Operations of Free Balloons, Agricultural Operations, Air Ambulance Operations, Aerodromes and Heliports, Safety Management System, Aviation Training Organisations, Aircraft Maintenance Organisations, Design Organisations for Products, Parts and Appliances, Manufacturing Organisations, Aviation Recreation Organisations, Aeronautical Telecommunication Service Providers (Electronic Services Organisations), Airspace and Air Traffic Services, Flight Procedure Design, Meteorological Information Services, Aeronautical Information Services, Allocation of Radio Telephony (RTF) Call Signs, 3-Letter Aircraft Designators and Location Indicators, Instrument Flight Procedures and ICAO Aeronautical Charts, Enforcement, Fees and Charges, Administration.

Airport Slot Coordination Regulations, 2012

Definitions, Designation of coordinated airports, Designation of schedules facilitated airports, Withdrawal of designation of a coordinated or a schedules facilitated airport, Relaxation of the designation of an airport, Temporary designation of an airport, Coordinated airports and special events, Appointment of the coordinator, Functions of the coordinator, The schedules facilitation function, Directives, Prohibition on acting as a coordinator or schedules facilitator, Appointment of the Slot Coordination Committee of South Africa, Removal of members of the committee, Functions of the committee, Meetings of the committee, Sub-committees, The determination of coordination parameters, Prohibition on using a coordinated airport without a slot, Requests for the allocation of slots, Preferences in the allocation of slots, Historic slots, Slot requests submitted after the initial submission deadline, Waiting list, Allocation of slots in respect of a designated period, Rules and guidelines on slot allocation, Provision of information on slot allocation The nature of slots, Other conditions of use, Changes to ad hoc slots, Types of misuse of slots, Misuse of slots, Publication of penalty, The withdrawal of slots, Provision of information to the coordinator, Exchange of information, Exclusion of liability, Short title and commencement.

Aircraft Passenger Safety Charge Regulations, 2010

These regulations detail the amount that shall be paid by aircraft passengers departing on an aircraft from an airport within the Republic of South Africa for domestic flights and International flights. This charge shall be included in the price payable in respect of the air ticket concerned. The Operator pays this amount to the Civil Aviation Authority.

Regulations to Govern Proceedings of the Regulating Committee (“The Committee”) of the Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) and The Air Traffic and Navigation Services Company (ATNS)

Details the appointment, authority and Powers of the Chairperson, Vice -Chairperson and committee. Quorums, communication procedures, Investigations and hearings, confidentiality, offences and penalties.

DETERMINATIONS

Determination to impose a fuel levy on the sale of aviation fuel

Details the levy per litre of fuel which is payable by consumers (including a wholesale distributor) on the sale of all aviation fuel which is manufactured, distilled, imported or sold in the Republic. The levy is to be collected by the wholesale distributors who are acting on behalf of the South African Civil Aviation Authority in this regard. This determination is referred to in the South African Civil Aviation Authority Levies Act No. 41 of 1998.

CONVENTIONS

Warsaw Convention

The Convention for the Unification of certain rules relating to international carriage by air, commonly known as the Warsaw Convention, is an international convention which regulates liability for international carriage of persons, luggage, or goods performed by aircraft for reward. Originally signed in 1929 in Warsaw, it was amended in 1955 at The Hague, Netherlands, and in 1971 in Guatemala City, Guatemala. United States courts have held that, at least for some purposes, the Warsaw Convention is a different instrument from the Warsaw Convention as amended by the Hague Protocol.

In 1952 a new draft was prepared by a legal committee set up by ICAO to replace the convention. However it was rejected and it was decided that the convention be amended rather than replaced in 1953. The work done by the legal committee at the Ninth Session was presented to the International Conference on Air Law which was convened by the Council of the ICAO and met at The Hague from 6 to 28 September 1955. The Hague Conference adopted a Protocol (the Hague Protocol) for the amendment of the Warsaw Convention. Between the parties of the Protocol, it was agreed that the 1929 Warsaw Convention and the 1955 Hague Protocol were to be read and interpreted together as one single instrument to be known as the Warsaw Convention as amended at the Hague in 1955. This was not an amendment to the convention but rather a creation of a new and separate legal instrument that is only binding between the parties. If one nation is a party to the Warsaw Convention and another to the Hague Protocol, neither state has an instrument in common and therefore there is no mutual international ground for litigation.

The Montreal Convention, signed in 1999, replaced the Warsaw Convention system.

Montreal Convention 1999

The Montreal Convention 1999 (MC99) establishes airline liability in the case of death or injury to passengers, as well as in cases of delay, damage or loss of baggage and cargo. It unifies all of the different international treaty regimes covering airline liability that had developed haphazardly since 1929. MC99 is designed to be a single, universal treaty to govern airline liability around the world.

It is also known as the Convention to the Unification of Certain Rules for International Carriage by Air and published in the South African Carriage by air Act, No 17 of 1946.

Chicago Convention

It is also known as the Convention on International Civil Aviation and is published in Schedule 3 of the South African Civil Aviation Act No 13 of 2009.

The Chicago Convention established the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), a specialized agency of the United Nations charged with coordinating and regulating international air travel. The Convention establishes rules of airspace, aircraft registration and safety, and details the rights of the signatories in relation to air travel; it also exempts air fuels from tax. The Convention was signed by 52 states on 7 December 1944 in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., and came into effect on 4 April 1947.

The Convention provided for the sovereignty of airspace above the territory of each state, together with five freedoms (later expanded to nine by the addition of four unofficial freedoms) which govern the freedom of states to operate air transport flights (including the carriage of passengers, cargo and mail) across, into and within the airspace of other states. Only the first two of these freedoms (see below) apply automatically to signatory states, the remainder being subject to national agreement.

The Convention also concerns the issue and recognition of certificates (e.g. an aircraft's certificate of airworthiness (C of A) or an airline's air operator certificate (AOC) and licences (e.g. pilot licensing or controller licensing).

Freedoms

Freedom Description
1st Right to overfly a foreign country without landing
2nd Right to refuel or carry out maintenance in a foreign country
3rd Right to fly from one's own country to another
4th Right to fly from a foreign country to one's own
5th Right to fly between two foreign countries during flights which begin or end in one's own
6th Right to fly from one foreign country to another one while stopping in one's own country
7th Right to fly between two foreign countries while not offering flights to one's own country
8th Right to fly between two or more airports in a foreign country while continuing service to one's own country
9th Right to fly inside a foreign country without continuing service to one's own country


Cape Town Convention and Protocol

The Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment was concluded in Cape Town on 16 November 2001, as was the Protocol on Matters Specific to Aircraft Equipment. The Convention and the Protocol, adopted under the joint auspices of ICAO and UNIDROIT, shall be read and interpreted together as a single instrument.

The primary aim of the Convention and the Protocol is to resolve the problem of obtaining certain and opposable rights to high-value aviation assets, namely airframes, aircraft engines and helicopters which, by their nature, have no fixed location. This problem arises primarily from the fact that legal systems have different approaches to securities, title retention agreements and lease agreements, which creates uncertainty for lending institutions regarding the efficacy of their rights. This hampers the provision of financing for such aviation assets and increases the borrowing cost.

As of 16 June 2016, there are 65 Parties to the Convention.

An advantage of creating an international interest recognized in all of the Contracting States and establishing an international electronic interest registration system, the Convention and Protocol improve predictability with respect to the opposability of the securities and the interest held by sellers of aviation assets. Indeed, it is estimated, based on World Bank data, that the mean worldwide contract enforcement delay is 10 months. The ratification of the Convention and the Protocol reduces this delay to two months (Linetsky, 2009).

Furthermore the Convention and Protocol are intended to reduce risks for creditors, and consequently, the borrowing costs to debtors, through the resulting improved legal certainty. This promotes the granting of credit for the acquisition of more modern and thus more fuel-efficient aircraft. The airlines of States that adopt the Convention and the Protocol may receive a ten percent (10%) discount on export credit premiums. For example, it was calculated that the adoption of the Convention will enable Australian airlines to save $330,000 on the purchase of a new ATR 72 and $2.5 million on the purchase of an Airbus A380 (cf. Flightglobal).

UNIDROIT - The International Institute for the Unification of Private Law; is an independent intergovernmental Organisation with its seat in Rome. Its purpose is to study needs and methods for modernising, harmonising and co-ordinating private and in particular commercial law as between States and groups of States and to formulate uniform law instruments, principles and rules to achieve those objectives (www.unidroit.org)

The Cape Town Convention is published in Schedule 1 of The South African Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment Act No. 4 of 2007, and referred to in Schedule 5 of the South African Civil Aviation Act 13 of 2009.

The Protocol to the Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment on Matters Specific to Aircraft Equipment is published in Schedule 2 of The South African Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment Act No. 4 of 2007.

The Convention and the Protocol, shall be read and interpreted together as a single instrument (Article 6(1) of the Convention).

Tokyo Convention

The Convention on Offences and Certain Other Acts Committed on Board Aircraft, commonly called the Tokyo Convention, is an international treaty, concluded at Tokyo on 14 September 1963. It entered into force on 4 December 1969, and as of 2015 has been ratified by 186 parties.

The Convention is applicable to offences against penal law and to any acts jeopardising the safety of persons or property on board civilian aircraft while in-flight and engaged in international air navigation. Coverage includes the commission of or the intention to commit offences and certain other acts on board aircraft registered in a Contracting State in-flight over the high seas and any other areas beyond the territory of any State in addition to the airspace belonging to any Contracting State. Criminal jurisdiction may be exercised by Contracting States other than the State of Registry under limited conditions, viz, when the exercise of jurisdiction is required under multilateral international obligations, in the interest of national security, and so forth.

The Convention, for the first time in the history of international aviation law, recognises certain powers and immunities of the aircraft commander who on international flights may restrain any person(s) he has reasonable cause to believe is committing or is about to commit an offence liable to interfere with the safety of persons or property on board or who is jeopardising good order and discipline.

In strictly domestic cases the Convention does not have application and acts and offences committed in the airspace of the State of Registry are excluded except when the point of departure or intended landing lies outside that State, or the aircraft enters into the airspace of a State other than the State of Registry as for example on a domestic flight which traverses the boundary of another State.

AGREEMENTS

Agreement entered into by and between The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA) and The South African Civil Aviation Authority (The CAA)

Both parties have entered into an agreement in terms of which ICASA appoints the CAA to conduct the examinations of proficiency envisaged herein and to issue the radiotelephony certificates on behalf of ICASA or in lieu of such certificates, endorse pilot licenses to authorise the use of radio apparatus on board aircraft. It was signed in 2010. Either party may terminate this Agreement by giving the other written notice of not less than 60 working days.

Performance agreement between the Minister of Transport, Civil Aviation Authority Board and the Director of Civil Aviation

In terms of section 94 of the Act, the Executive Authority, the Accounting Authority and the Director must enter into a Performance Agreement which is aimed at documenting the key performance measures and indicators to be attained by the Entity (SACAA) and the Director with regard to the safety and security issues as well as the achievement of the Entity’s objectives. The Accounting Authority must, in terms of the PFMA, comply with its fiduciary duties and manage all revenue, expenditure, assets and liabilities of the Entity effectively and efficiently;

The Executive Authority, the Accounting Authority and the Director wish to establish a transparent and accountable working relationship on matters relating to, among others, the implementation of the provisions of the PFMA, the Companies Act (if applicable) and the Act. Enter into this Performance Agreement to assist the Parties to measure the Entity’s performance, and to support and manage the working relationship between them; and to give effect to the obligations of the Executive Authority, the Accounting Authority and the Director as provided for in the Act and the PFMA.

AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION CIRCULAR (AIC)

An AIC is a notice containing information that does not qualify for the origination of a NOTAM or for inclusion into the AIP, but which relates to flight safety, air navigation, technical, administrative or legislative matters.

An AIC shall be issued whenever it is necessary to promulgate the following: The date of issue will appear on each AIC.

A check list of AIC (AIC 10.2) currently in force.

Serial numbers will be allocated which shall be consecutive and based on the calendar year. E.g. 001/2014, 002/2014 etc.

AIC’s are classified into the following subjects and subdivisions:
Series Subject Subdivisions
A 10 - 19 General 10. Publication
11. Reports of Commissions etc.
    12. Aeronautical Charts
    13. Registration of Aircraft
    14. Training
    15. Administration
    16. Reports from Pilots
    17. Gliding and Parachuting
    18. Legislation Matters
    19. Special Air Events
B 20 - 27 Operation of Aircraft 20. General
    21. Safety
    22. Regulation
    23. Accidents and Incidents
    24. Research and Medical Matters
    25. Navigation and Landing Aids
    26. Aircraft Equipment
    27. Military Airspace and Aerodromes
C 30 - 31 Personnel Licensing 30. General
    31. Aircrew - Pilots
D 40 - 45 Air Navigation Services 40. General
    41. Communication
    42. Flight Planning
    43. Meteorological Services
    44. Radar Services
    45. Special Procedures
E 50 - 52 Aerodromes 50. General
    51. Company Airports
    52. Licenced Aerodromes
F 60 - 65 Airworthiness 60. Administration
    61. Maintenance
    62. Avionics
    63. Operations
    64. Caution
    65. AME Matters

AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION PUBLICATION (AIP)

The publication of an AIP is intended primarily to satisfy international requirements for the exchange of aeronautical information of a lasting character and is essential to Air Navigation. The AIP constitutes the basic information source for permanent information and long duration temporary changes.

The South African AIP is published in three parts GEN, ENR and AD.

Each AIP shall not duplicate information within itself or from other sources.

For hard copies, the AIP’s can be purchased from the SACAA at a purchase price of R630-00 (excluding postage), which includes the amendment service for the current year.

AIP AMENDMENT SERVICE (AIP AMDT)

Permanent changes to the AIP shall be published as AIP Amendments. Amendments to AIP shall be issued every 3 months at the following predetermined intervals: 15 January, 15 April, 15 July, 15 October.

When an AIP amendment will not be published at the established interval, a NIL notification shall be originated and distributed by means of the Summary of NOTAM in force (NIF). Each AIP AMDT shall be allocated a serial number, which shall be consecutive and based on the calendar year. The year, indicated by two digits, is a part of the serial number of the amendment, e.g. AIP AMDT 1/96.

New or revised information contained in the AIP replacement pages will have an annotation (a thick vertical bar) next to the appropriate line. Should a page be reprinted because it was blank or backed a page containing changes, but does not carry any changes in respect to the previous edition, it shall not contain any highlighting symbols (vertical bar). A checklist of AIP pages containing page number/chart title and the publication or effective date (day, month by name and year) of the information is reissued with each amendment and is an integral part of the AIP.

Hard copies of AIP amendments cost R450-00 per year and are obtainable from SACAA.

AIP SUPPLEMENT SERVICE (AIP SUP)

The purpose of the AIP SUP is to bring to the attention of the user any temporary changes of long duration (three months or longer) and/or information of operational significance containing extensive text or graphics, which affect one or more parts of the AIP. Operationally significant changes shall be published under the AIRAC procedure (detailed below).

AIP SUP shall be numbered consecutively based on a calendar year. The period of validity will normally be given in the AIP SUP itself. Whenever an AIP SUP is issued to replace a NOTAM, a reference to the serial number of the relevant NOTAM shall be included. AIP SUP can be cancelled either by an AIP AMDT, AIP SUP or by NOTAM.

A checklist of valid AIP SUP shall be issued at intervals of not more than one month. Such information shall be issued through the monthly summary of NOTAM in force (NIF).

AIRAC AIP SUPPLEMENT (AIRAC AIP SUP)

The purpose of an AIP SUP is to bring to the attention of the user any temporary changes of long duration (three months or longer) and/or information of operational significance containing extensive text or graphics, which affect one or more parts of the AIP. Operationally significant changes shall be published in accordance with AIRAC procedures (detailed below) and shall be clearly identified by the acronym - AIRAC.

The AIRAC AIP SUP shall be published at least 56 days in advance of the effective date with the objective of reaching recipients at least 28 days in advance of the effective date. Effective dates will be published in accordance with the predetermined internationally agreed schedule of effective dates based on an interval of 28 days. Information notified by means of the AIRAC procedure shall not be changed for at least 28 days after the indicated effective date, unless the circumstance notified is of a temporary nature and would not persist for the full period.

When information has not been submitted for publication at the AIRAC date a NIL notification shall be originated and distributed by the monthly printed Plain Language Summary of NIF.

AIRAC PROCEDURE

In order to control and regulate the operationally significant changes requiring amendments to charts, route manuals etc., such changes, whenever possible, will be issued on predetermined dates according to the AIRAC SYSTEM. This type of information will be published as an AIRAC AIP SUP.

AIRAC information will be issued so that the information will be received by the user not later than 28 days, and for major changes not later than 56 days, before the effective date. At AIRAC effective date, a trigger NOTAM will be issued giving a brief description of the contents, effective date and reference number of the AIP AMDT or AIRAC AIP SUP that will become effective on that date. Trigger NOTAM will remain in force as a reminder in the PIB until the new checklist/summary is issued. If no information was submitted for publication at the AIRAC date, a NIL notification will be issued by NOTAM not later than one AIRAC cycle before the AIRAC effective date concerned.

Schedule of AIRAC Effective Dates 2019/2020

03 January 2019 02 January 2020 Nil Nil
31 January 2019 30 January 2020 28 January 2021 27 January 2022
28 February 2019 27 February 2020 25 February 2021 24 February 2022
28 March 2019 26 March 2020 25 March 2021 24 March 2022
25 April 2019 23 April 2020 22 April 2021 21 April 2022
23 May 2019 21 May 2020 20 May 2021 19 May 2022
20 June 2019 18 June 2020 17 June 2021 16 June 2022
18 July 2019 16 July 2020 15 July 2021 14 July 2022
15 August 2019 13 August 2020 12 August 2021 11 August 2022
12 September 2019 10 September 2020 09 September 2021 08 September 2022
10 October 2019 08 October 2020 07 October 2021 06 October 2022
07 November 2019 05 November 2020 04 November 2021 03 November 2022
05 December 2019 03 December 2020 02 December 2021 01 December 2022
Nil 31 December 2020 30 December 2021 29 December 2022

NOTICE TO AIRMEN (NOTAM)

A NOTAM is a notice distributed by means of the Aeronautical Fixed Service (AFS) containing information concerning the establishment, withdrawal and significant changes in operational capability of radio navigation and air-ground communication services, the timely knowledge of which is essential to personnel concerned with flight operations.

A NOTAM shall be originated and issued promptly when ever the information to be disseminated is of a temporary nature and of short duration or when operationally significant permanent changes, or temporary changes of long duration are made at short notice, except for extensive text or graphics.

NOTAM are distributed in six series identified by A,B, C, D, E and F as follows:

Series A: NOTAM containing information of concern to long or medium range flights, and given selected international distribution.

Series B: NOTAM containing full information on all aerodromes, facilities and procedures available for use in international civil aviation and given international distribution to adjacent States only.

Series C: NOTAM containing information of concern to aircraft other than those engaged in international civil aviation and given national distribution only.

Series D: NOTAM containing information of concern for military airports only and given selected international distribution.

Series E: NOTAM containing information of concern for heliports, helipads or helistops only and given international distribution to adjacent States only.

Series F: NOTAM containing information of administrative nature (e.g.: “Hand Amendments, Publications, Trigger NOTAM); and given selected international distribution.

NOTAM are originated and issued for South Africa for the entire area which coincides with the Cape Town, Johannesburg and Johannesburg Oceanic Flight Information Regions (FIRs). The area excludes, Lesotho and Swaziland as these States publish NOTAM.

Each international NOTAM office shall be connected, through the AFS, to the following points within the territory for which it provides service:

a) area control centres and flight information centres;
b) aerodromes/heliports at which an information service is established in accordance with Chapter 8.

When an AIP AMDT or an AIP SUP is published in accordance with AIRAC procedures, a TRIGGER NOTAM shall be originated giving a brief description of the contents, the effective date, and the reference number to the AIP AMDT or AIP SUP.

The basic purpose of a NOTAM is the dissemination of information in advance of the event to which it relates, except in the case of unserviceability which cannot be foreseen.

A NOTAM checklist shall be issued over the AFS, for each month on the first day of the following month, containing a numerical list of all NOTAM currently in force and referring to the latest AIP AMDT, AIP SUP and AIC issued.

Each NOTAM shall be transmitted as a single telecommunication message.

A NOTAM containing permanent or temporary information of long duration shall carry appropriate AIP or AIP Supplement references.

NOTAMC - Cancelling NOTAM
NOTAMN – New NOTAM
NOTAMR – Replacing NOTAM

Monthly NOTAM Summary
A monthly NOTAM summary and checklist of NOTAM in force is published on the 1st of every month and can be obtained from the International NOTAM Office. Telephone: +27 11 928 6592 and published on the Civil Aviation Authority website at www.caa.co.za

Weekly RSA NOTAM Summaries and PIB
Weekly RSA NOTAM summaries and Pre-Flight information Bulletin are posted on the CAA website www.caa.co.za on a daily basis from (MON-FRI), except on Public holidays and during the closure of the SACAA offices during the festive season.

Pre-Flight Information Bulletins (PIB)
Current NOTAM (and other information of urgent character for the operator/flight crews) are available in Pre-flight Information Bulletin (PIB) format. They are available from the Aeronautical Information Management Service Centre 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Telephone 0860 359 669 (FLYNOW) or +27 11 928 6518. Additional current information relating to the aerodrome of departure shall be provided concerning the following: Failure, irregular operation and changes in the operational status of radio navigation services, VHF aeromobile channels, RVR observing system and secondary power supply.

Additional Notam information can be found in AIC 008/2009 dated 12 September 2009.